yesEmily BirnbaumNone
×

Get access to Protocol

I’ve already subscribed

Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy

Bulletins

Biden's transition is stacked with tech players

Biden's transition is stacked with tech players

Joe Biden's transition is absolutely stacked with tech industry players, according to a list of Biden agency review teams released Tuesday.


There's no one on this new list from Facebook, Google or Apple (although there are people from those companies involved in the broader transition), but there's definitive Silicon Valley representation and thought leaders on tech issues involved in shaping the future of the federal government. We went through the list so you don't have to.

From big-name tech companies:

  • Tom Sullivan, Amazon's international policy team (State Department)
  • Mark Schwartz, Amazon Web Services' enterprise strategist (Office of Management and Budget)
  • Divya Kumaraiah, Airbnb's strategy and program lead for cities (Office of Management and Budget)
  • Brandon Belford, Lyft's senior director and its public policy team's chief of staff (Office of Management and Budget)
  • Nicole Isaac, LinkedIn's senior director of North America policy (Treasury Department)
  • Will Fields, Sidewalk Labs' senior development associate (Treasury Department)
  • Clare Gallagher, Airbnb's partnerships & events manager (National Security Council)
  • Matt Olsen, Uber's trust and security officer (Intelligence Community)
  • Arthur Plews, Stripe's strategy and operations lead (Small Business Administration)
  • Ted Dean, Dropbox's public policy lead (U.S. Trade Representative)
  • Ann Dunkin, Dell's chief technology officer (Environmental Protection Agency)
  • Phillip Carter, Tableau Software's senior corporate counsel (Department of Veterans Affairs)
  • Nairi Tashjian Hourdajian, VP of comms at Figma (Department of Transportation)
  • Nicole Wong, former Google and Twitter, former Obama Deputy Chief Technology Officer (Office of Science and Technology Policy)

From tech philanthropy:

  • Martha Gimbel, senior manager of economic research at Schmidt Futures (Council of Economic Advisers)
  • Andrew Nacin, director of engineering at CZI (U.S. Digital Service)
  • Austin Lin, technical program manager for security and privacy at CZI (Executive Office of the President, management and administration)
  • Linda Etim, senior adviser at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (team lead for International Development)

From tech advocacy:

  • Sarah Miller, executive director of the American Economic Liberties Project (Treasury Department)
  • Gene Kimmelman, senior adviser for Public Knowledge, former DOJ antitrust official (Department of Justice)
  • Laura Moy, director of Georgetown's Communications & Technology Law Clinic (Federal Trade Commission)
  • Bill Baer, visiting fellow at Brookings Institution, former FTC and DOJ (Federal Trade Commission)

There's also Victor Garcia and David Holmes from Rebellion Defense, a company backed by Eric Schmidt, and Natalie Kates and Raphael Majma from Reid Hoffman-backed Alloy.

Correction: This story was updated at 12:08 p.m. PT Nov. 11 to correct the title of Amazon's Tom Sullivan.

People

Making the economy work for Black entrepreneurs

Funding for Black-owned startups needs to grow. That's just the start.

"There is no quick fix to close the racial wealth and opportunity gaps, but there are many ways companies can help," said Mastercard's Michael Froman.

Photo: DigitalVision/Getty Images

Michael Froman is the vice chairman and president of Strategic Growth for Mastercard.

When Tanya Van Court's daughter shared her 9th birthday wish list — a bike and an investment account — Tanya had a moment of inspiration. She wondered whether helping more kids get excited about saving for goals and learning simple financial principles could help them build a pathway to financial security. With a goal of reaching every kid in America, she founded Goalsetter, a savings and financial literacy app for kids. Last month, Tanya brought in backers including NBA stars Kevin Durant and Chris Paul, raising $3.9 million in seed funding.

Keep Reading Show less
Michael Froman
Michael Froman serves as vice chairman and president, Strategic Growth for Mastercard. He and his team drive inclusive growth efforts and partner across public and private sectors to address major societal and economic issues. From 2013 to 2017, Mike served as the U.S. trade representative, President Barack Obama’s principal adviser and negotiator on international trade and investment issues. He is a distinguished fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations and a member of the board of directors of The Walt Disney Company.
Sponsored Content

Building better relationships in the age of all-remote work

How Stripe, Xero and ModSquad work with external partners and customers in Slack channels to build stronger, lasting relationships.

Image: Original by Damian Zaleski

Every business leader knows you can learn the most about your customers and partners by meeting them face-to-face. But in the wake of Covid-19, the kinds of conversations that were taking place over coffee, meals and in company halls are now relegated to video conferences—which can be less effective for nurturing relationships—and email.

Email inboxes, with hard-to-search threads and siloed messages, not only slow down communication but are also an easy target for scammers. Earlier this year, Google reported more than 18 million daily malware and phishing emails related to Covid-19 scams in just one week and more than 240 million daily spam messages.

Keep Reading Show less
Transforming 2021

Blockchain, QR codes and your phone: the race to build vaccine passports

Digital verification systems could give people the freedom to work and travel. Here's how they could actually happen.

One day, you might not need to carry that physical passport around, either.

Photo: CommonPass

There will come a time, hopefully in the near future, when you'll feel comfortable getting on a plane again. You might even stop at the lounge at the airport, head to the regional office when you land and maybe even see a concert that evening. This seemingly distant reality will depend upon vaccine rollouts continuing on schedule, an open-sourced digital verification system and, amazingly, the blockchain.

Several countries around the world have begun to prepare for what comes after vaccinations. Swaths of the population will be vaccinated before others, but that hasn't stopped industries decimated by the pandemic from pioneering ways to get some people back to work and play. One of the most promising efforts is the idea of a "vaccine passport," which would allow individuals to show proof that they've been vaccinated against COVID-19 in a way that could be verified by businesses to allow them to travel, work or relax in public without a great fear of spreading the virus.

Keep Reading Show less
Mike Murphy

Mike Murphy ( @mcwm) is the director of special projects at Protocol, focusing on the industries being rapidly upended by technology and the companies disrupting incumbents. Previously, Mike was the technology editor at Quartz, where he frequently wrote on robotics, artificial intelligence, and consumer electronics.

Latest Stories