Bulletins

New Dropbox tools will allow video capture and monetized files

The goal is to make remote work easier and attract creators to the platform.

Dropbox Capture

Dropbox launched three new tools focusing on video communication and monetized file-sharing.

Image: Dropbox

Dropbox just dropped three new tools it says will support the realities of modern, remote work. The goal is to make visual and video communication easier, as well as entice creators by allowing them to sell their products on the platform.


Video communication has become essential in the workplace, with days full of Zoom meetings. New tools that have launched over the past year, like Slack's Huddle, aim to replicate the easy, in-person chats of the pre-pandemic past. Dropbox's new features are no exception.

Dropbox Capture, which will allow workers to communicate through short videos and screen recordings, launched in beta mode today. Employees can send quick clips explaining tasks or ideas their team members don't understand — without having to schedule a meeting. It's similar to Loom, which is all about easily sharing and recording quick videos.

Dropbox's Replay feature also centers on video. You can send videos without having to download large files, or leave comments on the videos themselves.

Lastly, Dropbox is making a foray into the creator economy with the Dropbox Shop. Creators can list and sell digital content and maintain "100% ownership over your customer base," Dropbox says.

Capture is available in beta today. Users can sign up for beta access to Replay and Shop.

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