Bulletins

Uber, Facebook set dates for reopening offices

Facebook's office in Menlo Park

Facebook will reopen its Bay Area offices in May to a limited number of workers.

Photo: AFP/Getty Images

Uber is reopening — well, opening — its new San Francisco headquarters Monday, albeit at limited capacity. Meanwhile, Facebook will begin allowing workers back into some of its Bay Area offices up to 10% capacity in May, and those offices may reach 50% capacity by September.


Facebook will allow workers to remain remote up to one month after their office returns to 50% capacity, and the offices will continue to require safety protocols, including masking and some ongoing testing, according to Bloomberg.

Mark Zuckerberg has said that he expects as much as half of Facebook's workforce will remain remote over the coming decade, though those who relocate out of the Bay Area may be required to take a pay cut.

Uber announced Friday that it will open its Mission Bay headquarters with 20% occupancy on March 29, though staff can return on a voluntary basis and the company's work-from-home policy does not end until Sept. 13. Uber had planned to move into the headquarters in early 2020, but the pandemic delayed that.

In a December note from Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai, Google pushed back its return to offices to September 2021 and suggested that most employees may return in a hybrid model of at least three days a week in person.

Salesforce COO Bret Taylor said Thursday that the company was "very close" to reopening its San Francisco headquarters.

Protocol | Policy

Section 230’s lefty defenders are lawyering up

A Q&A with Elizabeth Banker, the new vice president of legal advocacy at the Democratic-allied tech group Chamber of Progress.

Cases related to Section 230 are on the rise.

Photo: Geoff Livingston/Getty Images

The Chamber of Progress, a tech trade association led by a former Google policy director and seeking to appeal to Democrats, is hiring its first vice president of legal advocacy. Elizabeth Banker comes to the role from a similar position with the Internet Association, a high-turnover trade group where Google and Facebook are key members. Her main job will be trying to protect the controversial legal shield for websites known as Section 230 as it comes under increasing pressure from lawmakers and in court. And yes, she said, it's possible the chamber itself will be suing, as other tech trade groups recently have.

The provision in question shields sites from being sued over content that third-party users, known in 230-speak as "information content providers," post. Firms say Sec. 230 protects free speech online while allowing companies to moderate the platforms as they see fit. The law is often considered a boon to tech companies, in part because it often leads to lawsuits against them being dismissed quickly.

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Ben Brody

Ben Brody (@ BenBrodyDC) is a senior reporter at Protocol focusing on how Congress, courts and agencies affect the online world we live in. He formerly covered tech policy and lobbying (including antitrust, Section 230 and privacy) at Bloomberg News, where he previously reported on the influence industry, government ethics and the 2016 presidential election. Before that, Ben covered business news at CNNMoney and AdAge, and all manner of stories in and around New York. He still loves appearing on the New York news radio he grew up with.


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Crypto crackdowns and fintech super apps

Plus, the Coinbase/Robinhood competition heats up.

Photo: Dmitry Demidko /Unsplash

On this episode of the Source Code podcast: Ben Pimentel joins the show to discuss China's aggressive moves against the crypto industry, Robinhood and Coinbase's battle for crypto supremacy, and PayPal's new financial super app. Then Tomio Geron explains what's going on at Binance, and why the largest crypto exchange in the world is under so much regulatory scrutiny.

For more on the topics discussed in this episode:

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David Pierce

David Pierce ( @pierce) is Protocol's editor at large. Prior to joining Protocol, he was a columnist at The Wall Street Journal, a senior writer with Wired, and deputy editor at The Verge. He owns all the phones.

Theranos 'valued PR' over patients, an ex-employee says

Adam Rosendorff said he felt pressured to vouch for tests he did not have confidence in. His testimony appeared to tie Holmes more closely to the lab's failures.

Elizabeth Holmes leaves the San Jose courthouse where her fraud trial is underway.

Photo: Jane Tyska/Digital First Media/The Mercury News via Getty Images

Former Theranos lab director Adam Rosendorff testified Friday that he repeatedly raised the alarm about bad blood tests to then-CEO Elizabeth Holmes, ultimately concluding that the company valued press and funding more than the patients.

"I was very enthusiastic working at Theranos in the beginning. Over time, I came to realize that the company really valued PR and fundraising above patient care, and I became very disillusioned," Rosendorff said on the witness stand inside the San Jose courtroom where Holmes' trial on fraud charges began this month.

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Biz Carson

Biz Carson ( @bizcarson) is a San Francisco-based reporter at Protocol, covering Silicon Valley with a focus on startups and venture capital. Previously, she reported for Forbes and was co-editor of Forbes Next Billion-Dollar Startups list. Before that, she worked for Business Insider, Gigaom, and Wired and started her career as a newspaper designer for Gannett.

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