Entertainment

Fortnite’s Dragon Ball Z event is too good to skip, plus more weekend recs

Don’t know what to do this weekend? We’ve got you covered.

Fortnite’s Dragon Ball Z event is too good to skip, plus more weekend recs

Our recommendations for your weekend.

Image: Hulu; Epic Games; New York Magazine

Summer’s almost over, but there’s still time to check out some content. This week we’re excited to play Fortnite’s Dragon Ball Z event; “Prey” on Hulu includes some award-winning performances; and we can’t wait to spend the weekend with the comically sinister Cult of the Lamb.

Fortnite’s Dragon Ball Z event

Fortnite’s latest anime collab is really too good to miss. Following a successful crossover with the Naruto universe earlier this summer, Akira Toriyama’s “Dragon Ball Z” has finally landed in Epic’s battle royale, and it's even better than we could have imagined. There are of course skins for purchase featuring protagonists Goku and Vegeta, and a quest tracker to unlock some other nice cosmetics for free. But it’s all the small touches — the in-game Kamehameha energy blast item and the ability to “power up” and transform your hair color, to name a few — that really push it over the edge and prove why Fortnite is truly at the forefront of the metaverse.

How the Three Arrows Capital co-founders torched the crypto market

The story of the so-called crypto geniuses behind crypto hedge fund Three Arrows Capital — Kyle Davies and Su Zhu — is almost too unbelievable, and you can already sense the limited-time HBO series or feature film Hollywood producers might try to cook up from these details. By far the best accounting yet of what exactly happened with TAC comes from Jen Wieczner at New York Magazine, who chronicled the rise and fall of the fund in a new feature this week, dishing out some hilarious new details, including the name of the duo’s $50 million super yacht that now sits vacant in Italy while Davies and Zhu remain in hiding.

‘Prey’ on Hulu is a refreshing update to the series

The Predator franchise isn’t exactly known for its sensitive portrayal of indigenous cultures. Yet, inexplicably, the new entry in the series about head-hunting alien assassins manages to accomplish many different things at once — including an award-worthy performance of a Comanche warrior from Sioux actress Amber Midthunder. The film features stellar action sequences and a refreshingly deep exploration of native gender roles as Midthunder’s Naru is pitted against a technologically advanced adversary.

Cult of the Lamb is comically sinister

Devolver Digital’s latest indie hit is Massive Monster’s Cult of the Lamb, an action-sim hybrid that blends elements of Animal Crossing with roguelike dungeon crawling. One part of the game involves growing a religious cult of followers through often vicious and manipulative means as part of a vengeful plot to strike back at the gods of old who sent you to be sacrificed. The other involves venturing into randomized dungeons to grow your following and strike your enemies down, all while providing for your growing religious order. The game’s comically sinister overtones mixed with its cartoony art style keep the overall tone light, but with enough depth to say something meaningful about the perils of organized religion.

A version of this story also appeared in today’s Entertainment newsletter; subscribe here.

Enterprise

Microsoft’s new chief partner officer: 'Customers need help'

The new Microsoft Cloud Partner Program forces new certification requirements on the hundreds of thousands of partners that sell and support its products and services. Nicole Dezen says those changes now give customers “total clarity” into which ones are best suited to meet their cloud needs.

Nicole Dezen, Microsoft's chief partner officer, talked with Protocol last week about the company's announcement.

Photo: Microsoft

As Microsoft launches the biggest overhaul of its partner program today since 2010, its new chief partner officer says the changes will help enterprises and other customers more easily identify qualified partners that are the right fit to help with their cloud needs.

“All of our priorities, all of our design principles, are built with the customer in mind,” Nicole Dezen, Microsoft’s chief partner officer and corporate vice president of global partner solutions, told Protocol in an exclusive interview, her first since being appointed in July.

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Donna Goodison

Donna Goodison (@dgoodison) is Protocol's senior reporter focusing on enterprise infrastructure technology, from the 'Big 3' cloud computing providers to data centers. She previously covered the public cloud at CRN after 15 years as a business reporter for the Boston Herald. Based in Massachusetts, she also has worked as a Boston Globe freelancer, business reporter at the Boston Business Journal and real estate reporter at Banker & Tradesman after toiling at weekly newspapers.

Sponsored Content

Great products are built on strong patents

Experts say robust intellectual property protection is essential to ensure the long-term R&D required to innovate and maintain America's technology leadership.

Every great tech product that you rely on each day, from the smartphone in your pocket to your music streaming service and navigational system in the car, shares one important thing: part of its innovative design is protected by intellectual property (IP) laws.

From 5G to artificial intelligence, IP protection offers a powerful incentive for researchers to create ground-breaking products, and governmental leaders say its protection is an essential part of maintaining US technology leadership. To quote Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo: "intellectual property protection is vital for American innovation and entrepreneurship.”

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James Daly
James Daly has a deep knowledge of creating brand voice identity, including understanding various audiences and targeting messaging accordingly. He enjoys commissioning, editing, writing, and business development, particularly in launching new ventures and building passionate audiences. Daly has led teams large and small to multiple awards and quantifiable success through a strategy built on teamwork, passion, fact-checking, intelligence, analytics, and audience growth while meeting budget goals and production deadlines in fast-paced environments. Daly is the Editorial Director of 2030 Media and a contributor at Wired.
Workplace

An IPO may soon be in Notion’s future

Notion COO Akshay Kothari says there’s room to grow, aided by a new CFO who knows how to take a company public.

Notion has hired its first chief financial officer: Rama Katkar.

Photo: Courtesy of Notion

It’s been a year since Notion’s triumphant $275 million funding round and $10 billion valuation. Since then the landscape for productivity startups trying to make it on their own has completely changed, especially for those pandemic darlings that flourished in the all-remote world.

As recession looms, companies looking to cut costs are less likely to spend money on tools outside of their Microsoft or Google workplace bundles. Enterprise platforms are bulking up and it could spell trouble for the productivity startups trying to unseat them. But Notion COO Akshay Kothari says the company is still aiming to build the next Microsoft, not be the next Microsoft. And in a move signaling a new chapter of maturity, Notion has hired its first chief financial officer: Rama Katkar, Instacart’s former VP of finance.

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Lizzy Lawrence

Lizzy Lawrence ( @LizzyLaw_) is a reporter at Protocol, covering tools and productivity in the workplace. She's a recent graduate of the University of Michigan, where she studied sociology and international studies. She served as editor in chief of The Michigan Daily, her school's independent newspaper. She's based in D.C., and can be reached at llawrence@protocol.com.

Securing the Enterprise

Securing the enterprise

There’s no let-up in the surge of cyberattacks against businesses. But shutting down the hackers will require many enterprises to evolve their strategy.

In today’s enterprise, “identity and security are very merged.”

Illustration: iStock/Getty Images Plus; Protocol
the Protocol team
Protocol focuses on the people, power and politics of tech, with no agenda and just one goal: to arm decision-makers in tech, business and public policy with the unbiased, fact-based news and analysis they need to navigate a world in rapid change.
Fintech

How neobanks are helping consumers game credit scoring

The CFPB says it is closely monitoring secured credit cards offered by neobanks.

Regulators are scrutinizing neobanks' card offerings.

Photo: Oscar Wong/Moment/Getty Images

About one in six Americans has a credit score below 619, according to the CFPB. Another 23% have too thin a credit file to score or no file at all. That puts them in a credit trap: To build credit, these consumers need someone to give them a line of credit with which they can demonstrate good financial habits. But with scores that low, few lenders are prepared to offer them anything.

Neobanks say they can solve the problem through a new twist on secured credit cards. But regulators are already scrutinizing their offerings.

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Veronica Irwin

Veronica Irwin (@vronirwin) is a San Francisco-based reporter at Protocol covering fintech. Previously she was at the San Francisco Examiner, covering tech from a hyper-local angle. Before that, her byline was featured in SF Weekly, The Nation, Techworker, Ms. Magazine and The Frisc.

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