Here are all the Facebook Papers stories

They paint a picture of Facebook that's very different from what Mark Zuckerberg likes to say.

Here are all the Facebook Papers stories
Image: Getty Images, Protocol

Monday morning's news drop was a doozy. There was story after story about the goings-on inside Facebook, thanks to thousands of leaked documents from Frances Haugen, the whistleblower who wants the information within those files to spread far and wide. Haugen is also set to speak in front of the British Parliament on Monday, continuing the story that is becoming known as The Facebook Papers.


Before it was The Facebook Papers, of course, it was The Facebook Files, a Wall Street Journal series that included the first looks at many of Haugen's documents. (You can read the backstory of that name change, along with more details on the consortium of journalists that worked together on the Papers stories, from The New York Times.)

The stories started to publish last Friday night, but landed with a bang Monday morning and have been coming out ever since. Since they're spread across lots of publications, we've rounded them all up in one place (in no particular order), to make them easier to find and read. We've tried to focus on the stories about the documents themselves, rather than about the fallout or the PR spin or any of the other Facebook issues from this week. And we'll keep adding stories here as new ones publish.

Facebook's internal chat boards show politics often at center of decision making — The Wall Street Journal

Facebook's hiring crisis: Engineers are turning down offers, internal docs show — Protocol

Facebook wrestles with the features it used to define social networking — The New York Times

Internal alarm, public shrugs: Facebook's employees dissect its election role — The New York Times

In India, Facebook grapples with an amplified version of its problems — The New York Times

In Poland's politics, a 'social civil war' brewed as Facebook rewarded online anger — The Washington Post

The case against Mark Zuckerberg: Insiders say Facebook's CEO chose growth over safety — The Washington Post

How Facebook neglected the rest of the world, fueling hate speech and violence in India — The Washington Post

Five points for anger, one for a 'like': How Facebook's formula fostered rage and misinformation — The Washington Post

Inside Facebook, Jan. 6 violence fueled anger, regret over missed warning signs — The Washington Post

How Facebook shapes your feed — The Washington Post

Facebook documents offer a treasure trove for Washington's antitrust war — POLITICO

'This is NOT normal': Facebook employees vent their anguish — POLITICO

Facebook's Jan. 6 problem: A thin playbook for false election claims — POLITICO

How Facebook users wield multiple accounts to spread toxic politics — POLITICO

Facebook's 'fatal flaw': Staff spar over the sway of their lobbyists — POLITICO

Facebook did little to moderate posts in the world's most violent countries — POLITICO

The Facebook Papers: Documents reveal internal fury and dissent over site's policies — NBC News

'Carol's Journey': What Facebook knew about how it radicalized users — NBC News

The Facebook Papers: Documents reveal internal fury and dissent over site's policies — CNBC

The Facebook Papers may be the biggest crisis in the company's history — CNN

Facebook knew it was being used to incite violence in Ethiopia. It did little to stop the spread, documents show — CNN

Facebook has known it has a human trafficking problem for years. It still hasn't fully fixed it — CNN

Facebook has language blind spots around the world that allow hate speech to flourish — CNN

Not stopping 'Stop the Steal:' Facebook Papers paint damning picture of company's role in insurrection — CNN

Facebook is having a tougher time managing vaccine misinformation than it is letting on, leaks suggest — CNN

Inside Facebook's struggle to keep young people — The Verge

Facebook's leaked tier list: how the company decides which countries need protection — The Verge

Hey, kid, wanna see some leaked Facebook docs? — Gizmodo

The Climate Denial Is Coming From Inside Facebook's House — Gizmodo

Facebook Has No Clue How to Solve Its Image Problem, Leaked Doc Shows — Gizmodo

How the 2019 Christchurch Massacre Changed Facebook Forever — Gizmodo

Facebook is everywhere; its moderation is nowhere close — Wired

How to fix Facebook, according to Facebook employees — Wired

Facebook failed the people who tried to improve it — Wired

Facebook's language gaps weaken screening of hate, terrorism — Associated Press

America 'on fire': Facebook watched as Trump ignited hate — Associated Press

Facebook dithered in curbing divisive user content in India — Associated Press

Apple once threatened Facebook ban over Mideast maid abuse — Associated Press

People or profit? Facebook papers show deep conflict within — Associated Press

Facebook froze as anti-vaccine comments swarmed users – Associated Press

The Facebook Papers: What you need to know — NPR

Employees pleaded with Facebook to stop letting politicians bend rules — The Financial Times

Facebook bungled efforts to curb explosion of hate speech ahead of Capitol attack — The Financial Times

The Facebook Papers: social network shaken by content, user woe — Bloomberg

Facebook, alarmed by teen usage drop, left investors in the dark — Bloomberg

Facebook Privately Worried About Hate Speech Spawning Violence — Bloomberg

Facebook staff say core products make misinformation worse — Bloomberg

Facebook hobbled team tasked with stemming harmful content — Bloomberg

Facebook Papers: 'history will not judge us kindly' — The Atlantic

How Facebook failed the world — The Atlantic

What happened when Facebook became boomerbook — The Atlantic

Facebook knew about, failed to police, abusive content globally — Reuters

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