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IBM wants to help people ‘reimagine the resume’

A letter to the U.S. secretaries of Education and Labor suggests allowing federal funds to be used for skills education.

IBM wants to help people ‘reimagine the resume’

IBM's letter details working with the new administration to give Americans more pathways to skills-based careers, expanding access to federal student aid and creating a national credentialing system to reimagine the resume.

Photo: SOPA Images/Getty Images

Global tech giant IBM published a letter Thursday to the U.S. secretaries of Education and Labor with ideas and policy recommendations on how the country can lead in education and build a more equitable economy.

IBM's letter proposes collaboration with the new administration to give Americans more pathways to skills-based careers, expand access to federal student aid and create a national credentialing system — using blockchain — to reimagine the resume.

The shift to online learning disrupted 77 million students in the U.S. And with nearly 70% of Americans without a bachelor's degree, which often means their work can't be performed from home, the economy tanked as businesses were forced to shut down. "When we look at the unemployment rate and we juxtaposed that with the number of opportunities that remain open because of the need for specific of type of skills, we see that as a paradox and challenge that we need to overcome," said Obed Louissaint, IBM's SVP for transformation and culture.

Outside the traditional forms of demonstrating job qualifications to future employers through a resume or a degree, there is no standard way to prove job readiness. But Louissaint explained that "new-collar jobs" would require in-demand skills, rather than a college degree, and would eliminate bachelor's degree requirements for more than half of U.S. job openings. By modernizing the Higher Education Act and working with policymakers; allowing federal student loans to be used for apprenticeships, certificate programs or other mid-career training; and removing restrictions on student use of federal work-study funds for off-campus work experiences like internships at companies, students could build career-relevant skills, Louissaint said.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the technology sector accounts for 10% of U.S. GDP and is the fastest-growing segment of the American economy. But there are not enough skilled workers to fill the 500,000 open high-tech jobs in the U.S. And in the Consumer Technology Association's Future of Work survey, tech executives report that by 2025, they will struggle to fill jobs in software development, data analytics and engineering.

If the new administration partners with the private sector, the $130 billion provided in federal student aid to undergraduate students pursuing a bachelor's degree or higher could be redirected toward part-time students and mid-career professionals, used to fund Pell Grants and similar financial assistance for apprenticeships or internships. IBM also suggests allowing federal funds to be used for skills education and removing restrictions so that students can use federal work-study funds for other off-campus work experiences.

"By taking investments that are already being made in things like Pell Grants or federal loans, and redirecting them into things like apprenticeships, it enables individuals to have access to well-paying jobs," Louissaint said. "And by thinking differently about the resume, government and academia can set a real standard for what are credentials for a skill-first economy."

By working with the government, IBM aims to set a standard and national infrastructure that job applicants and potential employers can reference. But what would that look like?

"We would love to see state governments play a much more active role, rather than funds being restricted to local districts where only students in wealthier areas will benefit," Louissaint said. "And by way of the federal government, we can really lean in to use these funds in different types of ways to complement skill-building in this country."

Power

Google wants to help you get a life

Digital car windows, curved AR glasses, automatic presentations and other patents from Big Tech.

A new patent from Google offers a few suggestions.

Image: USPTO

Another week has come to pass, meaning it's time again for Big Tech patents! You've hopefully been busy reading all the new Manual Series stories that have come out this week and are now looking forward to hearing what comes after what comes next. Google wants to get rid of your double-chin selfie videos and find things for you as you sit bored at home; Apple wants to bring translucent displays to car windows; and Microsoft is exploring how much you can stress out a virtual assistant.

And remember: The big tech companies file all kinds of crazy patents for things, and though most never amount to anything, some end up defining the future.

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Mike Murphy

Mike Murphy ( @mcwm) is the director of special projects at Protocol, focusing on the industries being rapidly upended by technology and the companies disrupting incumbents. Previously, Mike was the technology editor at Quartz, where he frequently wrote on robotics, artificial intelligence, and consumer electronics.

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The future of computing at the edge: an interview with Intel’s Tom Lantzsch

An interview with Tom Lantzsch, SVP and GM, Internet of Things Group at Intel

An interview with Tom Lantzsch

Senior Vice President and General Manager of the Internet of Things Group (IoT) at Intel Corporation

Edge computing had been on the rise in the last 18 months – and accelerated amid the need for new applications to solve challenges created by the Covid-19 pandemic. Tom Lantzsch, Senior Vice President and General Manager of the Internet of Things Group (IoT) at Intel Corp., thinks there are more innovations to come – and wants technology leaders to think equally about data and the algorithms as critical differentiators.

In his role at Intel, Lantzsch leads the worldwide group of solutions architects across IoT market segments, including retail, banking, hospitality, education, industrial, transportation, smart cities and healthcare. And he's seen first-hand how artificial intelligence run at the edge can have a big impact on customers' success.

Protocol sat down with Lantzsch to talk about the challenges faced by companies seeking to move from the cloud to the edge; some of the surprising ways that Intel has found to help customers and the next big breakthrough in this space.

What are the biggest trends you are seeing with edge computing and IoT?

A few years ago, there was a notion that the edge was going to be a simplistic model, where we were going to have everything connected up into the cloud and all the compute was going to happen in the cloud. At Intel, we had a bit of a contrarian view. We thought much of the interesting compute was going to happen closer to where data was created. And we believed, at that time, that camera technology was going to be the driving force – that just the sheer amount of content that was created would be overwhelming to ship to the cloud – so we'd have to do compute at the edge. A few years later – that hypothesis is in action and we're seeing edge compute happen in a big way.

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Saul Hudson
Saul Hudson has a deep knowledge of creating brand voice identity, especially in understanding and targeting messages in cutting-edge technologies. He enjoys commissioning, editing, writing, and business development, in helping companies to build passionate audiences and accelerate their growth. Hudson has reported from more than 30 countries, from war zones to boardrooms to presidential palaces. He has led multinational, multi-lingual teams and managed operations for hundreds of journalists. Hudson is a Managing Partner at Angle42, a strategic communications consultancy.
Protocol | Fintech

IBM’s huge bet on building a cloud for banks

Howard Boville left his post as Bank of America's CTO to lead Big Blue's bold cloud offensive. Can he make it work?

IBM is embarking on an ambitious bid to build a cloud banking platform.

Image: Scott Eells/Getty Images

Moving to the cloud can be burdensome for a bank: If you don't know exactly how and where your company's data is being stored, meeting regulations that control it can be almost impossible. Howard Boville is betting he can solve that problem.

Last spring, Boville left his post as chief technology officer at Bank of America to lead IBM's ambitious bid to build a cloud banking platform. The concept: that any bank or fintech would automatically be following the rules in any part of the world it operates, as soon as it started using the platform.

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Benjamin Pimentel

Benjamin Pimentel ( @benpimentel) covers fintech from San Francisco. He has reported on many of the biggest tech stories over the past 20 years for the San Francisco Chronicle, Dow Jones MarketWatch and Business Insider, from the dot-com crash, the rise of cloud computing, social networking and AI to the impact of the Great Recession and the COVID crisis on Silicon Valley and beyond. He can be reached at bpimentel@protocol.com or via Signal at (510)731-8429.

Transforming 2021

Blockchain, QR codes and your phone: the race to build vaccine passports

Digital verification systems could give people the freedom to work and travel. Here's how they could actually happen.

One day, you might not need to carry that physical passport around, either.

Photo: CommonPass

There will come a time, hopefully in the near future, when you'll feel comfortable getting on a plane again. You might even stop at the lounge at the airport, head to the regional office when you land and maybe even see a concert that evening. This seemingly distant reality will depend upon vaccine rollouts continuing on schedule, an open-sourced digital verification system and, amazingly, the blockchain.

Several countries around the world have begun to prepare for what comes after vaccinations. Swaths of the population will be vaccinated before others, but that hasn't stopped industries decimated by the pandemic from pioneering ways to get some people back to work and play. One of the most promising efforts is the idea of a "vaccine passport," which would allow individuals to show proof that they've been vaccinated against COVID-19 in a way that could be verified by businesses to allow them to travel, work or relax in public without a great fear of spreading the virus.

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Mike Murphy

Mike Murphy ( @mcwm) is the director of special projects at Protocol, focusing on the industries being rapidly upended by technology and the companies disrupting incumbents. Previously, Mike was the technology editor at Quartz, where he frequently wrote on robotics, artificial intelligence, and consumer electronics.

How the tech industry should navigate the Biden administration

Tech faces more potential regulation than perhaps ever before.

The government's anxiety about the tech industry's power has manifested in over-broad reactions, writes Adam Kovacevich.

Photo: Joe Raedle

During President Obama's eight years in power, the tech industry and administration fell hard for each other. Now, in the Biden era, the relationship is about to get more complicated.

The Obama administration embodied the ethos of tech: curious, optimistic, win-win. His administration employed many veterans of the technology industry, and tech industry officials met frequently with administration officials and the president himself.

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Adam Kovacevich
Adam Kovacevich is a former public policy executive for Google and Lime and a longtime tech policy strategist based in Washington, D.C.
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