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Security is a data problem

Protocol Enterprise

Hello and welcome to Protocol Enterprise! Today: why Snowflake thinks its data lake technology is ideal for cybersecurity applications, the U.K. vows to take a much closer look at competitiveness in cloud computing, and this week in enterprise moves.

Security enters the data age

Cybersecurity might be a bit late to the game on getting the full benefits of the cloud for data analytics, but better late than never.

Right now, a major focus at cloud data platform Snowflake is helping customers bring their security feeds together with data from other parts of the business, within its unified data lake.

  • That mashup can enable better-informed threat detections and breach investigations, according to Snowflake executives.
  • For instance, correlating HR data with email-forwarding events could help detect if a worker is trying to leak sensitive information.
  • At one Snowflake customer, Figma, having a single data lake for the whole company has allowed for analysis of cybersecurity data in a broader context, enabling a better understanding of security risks.
  • "The more signals you have, the more patterns you can find," said Christian Kleinerman, Snowflake's senior vice president of product.

Snowflake customers have already brought other types of data together in the cloud in this way, of course. But there's a good reason why it's taken this long to bring security into the fold.

  • Cybersecurity activity generates way more data than anything else — a nonstop stream of logs and events.
  • As a result, storing security data for any period of time can get costly and often requires tough choices about what to keep.
  • Snowflake, however, separates pricing between storage and compute. And that "works very well for security," said Uri May, co-founder and CEO of Hunters, a Snowflake cybersecurity partner.
  • Using Snowflake, a customer only pays for compute time on its security data when it needs to be queried, such as in the event of a breach.

That's a huge win for security teams because it means that many more will be able to afford storing their data for review later on, according to Devdatta Akhawe, head of security at Figma.

  • Deleting security data after a short time "is just illogical. You're flying blind when the actual breach is disclosed," Akhawe told me.
  • Snowflake, on the other hand, "gives us the ability to scale to gigantic amounts of [security] data."

Read the full story here.

— Kyle Alspach (email | twitter)

A MESSAGE FROM CAPITAL ONE SOFTWARE

Capital One’s adoption of modern cloud and data capabilities led us to create tools to operate at scale in the cloud. Capital One Software is bringing these solutions to market to help you accelerate your cloud and data journey. Get started with Slingshot, a data management solution for Snowflake customers.

Learn more

Enterprise moves

Over the past week New Relic, Splunk, Dataiku, and more added new execs.

Allan Thygesen is the new CEO at DocuSign, after spending 12 years at Google in various advertising sales leadership roles.

Daniel Brennan is the new chief legal officer at Dataiku. Brennan was formerly vice president and deputy general counsel at Twitter.

Siva Padisetty joined New Relic as SVP and GM of the Telemetry Data Platform and global infrastructure. Padisetty was formerly an executive at AWS.

Tia Williams joined New Relic as GVP of design and product experience. Williams was formerly a VP at Salesforce.

Tom Casey joined Splunk as SVP and GM of Platform. Casey was formerly SVP of engineering at DocuSign.

Michelle Grover joined Slalom as CTO. Grover was formerly CIO at Twilio.

Marc Rogers joined Q-Net as CSO. Rogers was formerly VP of cybersecurity strategy at Okta.

Mary Writz joined Sift as SVP of product. Writz formerly held product leadership roles at HP and IBM.

Dan Maloney joined Landing AI as COO. Maloney was formerly executive vice president at DataRobot and a global vice president at SAP.

— Aisha Counts (email | twitter)

Around the enterprise

AWS, Microsoft, and Google will be subject to a competitive review by U.K. communications regulator Ofcom, which plans to issue a report within a year.

Alibaba plans to expand its partner network outside of China, announcing plans to spend $1 billion to reach more customers outside its home market.

A MESSAGE FROM CAPITAL ONE SOFTWARE

Capital One’s adoption of modern cloud and data capabilities led us to create tools to operate at scale in the cloud. Capital One Software is bringing these solutions to market to help you accelerate your cloud and data journey. Get started with Slingshot, a data management solution for Snowflake customers.

Learn more

Thanks for reading — see you tomorrow!

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