source-codesource codeauthorDavid PierceNoneWant your finger on the pulse of everything that's happening in tech? Sign up to get David Pierce's daily newsletter.64fd3cbe9f
×

Get access to Protocol

I’ve already subscribed

Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy

Bumble’s IPO, digital books and PayPal’s future

This week on the Source Code podcast: Hirsh Chitkara on Bumble's big IPO, Anna Kramer on Libby and the future of digital books, and Tomio Geron on PayPal's plan to win the future of finance.

For more on the topics in this episode:

Subscribe to the show: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Podcasts | Pocket Casts | RSS
Power

Everything you need to know about the Coinbase direct listing

Coinbase's IPO valuation could be the largest by a U.S. tech company since Facebook went public.

Coinbase will go public on Feb. 25.

Image: Chesnot/Getty Images

Coinbase, the cryptocurrency exchange, filed its S-1 on Feb. 25 to go public via direct listing on Nasdaq. In the lead-up to the IPO, Coinbase shares traded on the Nasdaq Private Markets at $373, yielding a company valuation of over $100 billion, per Axios. If share prices remain at or above these levels, Coinbase's IPO valuation could be the largest by a U.S. tech company since Facebook went public in 2012. The company hasn't yet set a date for its trading debut.

Depending on who you ask, the Coinbase IPO could be the latest symptom of a major financial bubble or a significant milestone in the restructuring of the global financial system. Coinbase's mission is to "create an open financial system to the world." It believes the prevailing system of global finance, with the U.S. dollar serving as the global reserve currency, is outdated and inefficient. This mission pits the interests of Coinbase squarely against many of the world's most powerful nations, making regulation a grave and — if cryptos continue gaining momentum — probable risk.

Keep Reading Show less
Hirsh Chitkara
Hirsh Chitkara (@ChitkaraHirsh) is a researcher at Protocol, based out of New York City. Before joining Protocol, he worked for Business Insider Intelligence, where he wrote about Big Tech, telecoms, workplace privacy, smart cities, and geopolitics. He also worked on the Strategy & Analytics team at the Cleveland Indians.
Sponsored Content

Building better relationships in the age of all-remote work

How Stripe, Xero and ModSquad work with external partners and customers in Slack channels to build stronger, lasting relationships.

Image: Original by Damian Zaleski

Every business leader knows you can learn the most about your customers and partners by meeting them face-to-face. But in the wake of Covid-19, the kinds of conversations that were taking place over coffee, meals and in company halls are now relegated to video conferences—which can be less effective for nurturing relationships—and email.

Email inboxes, with hard-to-search threads and siloed messages, not only slow down communication but are also an easy target for scammers. Earlier this year, Google reported more than 18 million daily malware and phishing emails related to Covid-19 scams in just one week and more than 240 million daily spam messages.

Keep Reading Show less
People

Citizen’s plan to keep people safe (and beat COVID-19) with an app

Citizen CEO Andrew Frame talks privacy, safety, coronavirus and the future of the neighborhood watch.

Citizen added COVID-19 tracking to its app over the summer — but its bigger plans got derailed.

Photo: Citizen

Citizen is an app built on the idea that transparency is a good thing. It's the place users — more than 7 million of them, in 28 cities with many more to come soon — can find out when there's a crime, a protest or an incident of any kind nearby. (Just yesterday, it alerted me, along with 17,900 residents of Washington, D.C., that it was about to get very windy. It did indeed get windy.) Users can stream or upload video of what's going on, locals can chat about the latest incidents and everyone's a little safer at the end of the day knowing what's happening in their city.

At least, that's how CEO Andrew Frame sees it. Critics of Citizen say the app is creating hordes of voyeurs, incentivizing people to run into dangerous situations just to grab a video, and encouraging racial profiling and other problematic behaviors all under the guise of whatever "safety" means. They say the app promotes paranoia, alerting users to things that they don't actually need to know about. (That the app was originally called "Vigilante" doesn't help its case.)

Keep Reading Show less
David Pierce

David Pierce ( @pierce) is Protocol's editor at large. Prior to joining Protocol, he was a columnist at The Wall Street Journal, a senior writer with Wired, and deputy editor at The Verge. He owns all the phones.

Transforming 2021

Blockchain, QR codes and your phone: the race to build vaccine passports

Digital verification systems could give people the freedom to work and travel. Here's how they could actually happen.

One day, you might not need to carry that physical passport around, either.

Photo: CommonPass

There will come a time, hopefully in the near future, when you'll feel comfortable getting on a plane again. You might even stop at the lounge at the airport, head to the regional office when you land and maybe even see a concert that evening. This seemingly distant reality will depend upon vaccine rollouts continuing on schedule, an open-sourced digital verification system and, amazingly, the blockchain.

Several countries around the world have begun to prepare for what comes after vaccinations. Swaths of the population will be vaccinated before others, but that hasn't stopped industries decimated by the pandemic from pioneering ways to get some people back to work and play. One of the most promising efforts is the idea of a "vaccine passport," which would allow individuals to show proof that they've been vaccinated against COVID-19 in a way that could be verified by businesses to allow them to travel, work or relax in public without a great fear of spreading the virus.

Keep Reading Show less
Mike Murphy

Mike Murphy ( @mcwm) is the director of special projects at Protocol, focusing on the industries being rapidly upended by technology and the companies disrupting incumbents. Previously, Mike was the technology editor at Quartz, where he frequently wrote on robotics, artificial intelligence, and consumer electronics.

People

Anjali Sud is reinventing Vimeo and the future of video

It's not a YouTube competitor anymore. It's something much bigger.

Anjali Sud has been CEO of Vimeo since 2017, and has totally changed the company in that time.

Photo: Vimeo

Anjali Sud's first day as Vimeo CEO was an eventful one. Not only was she standing in front of the company as its new leader, she was telling them that things were about to change. A lot. After more than a decade operating as a home for streaming content — sometimes a YouTube competitor, other times coming for Netflix, never quite reaching either goal — Vimeo was going to become a SaaS company. It would be wooing IT managers and vice presidents, not A-list directors and Golden Globes voters. Even after the initial shock wore off, she knew it would take a while to change the structures, incentives, goals and workflows to become a different kind of company.

That was 2017. Now it's early 2021, and Vimeo is on a tear. Sud and her team are getting ready to spin out of Barry Diller's IAC later this year, turning Vimeo into a public company in its own right. They've raised $450 million in capital ahead of that change, and are currently valued at about $5.7 billion. Vimeo has more than 200 million users, 1.5 million of whom pay for its services. Its revenue increased 54% in the most recent quarter compared to a year ago, and by some measures the company is already profitable.

Keep Reading Show less
David Pierce

David Pierce ( @pierce) is Protocol's editor at large. Prior to joining Protocol, he was a columnist at The Wall Street Journal, a senior writer with Wired, and deputy editor at The Verge. He owns all the phones.

Latest Stories