Policy

What’s next for tech in a post-Roe world

From employee support to privacy concerns, tech companies play a critical role in what’s to come for abortion access in the U.S.

Pro-choice demonstrators during a protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, May 3, 2022. Abortion rights suddenly emerged as an issue that could reshape the battle between Democrats and Republicans for control of Congress, following a report that conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court were poised to strike down the half-century-old Roe v. Wade precedent. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

States banning abortion means that tech will play a critical role in what’s to come for abortion access in the U.S.

Photo: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Updated: June 27, 1:16 p.m. ET

The end of Roe v. Wade has sent the world of tech scrambling. Many companies are now trying to quickly figure out how to protect workers in states where abortion will be banned, while also facing potential privacy and legal ramifications.


Here’s a look at tech companies’ roles and responses to the ruling. We will update this page as news and events change.

How could this decision affect Big Tech?

How are tech companies responding?

How will this affect your privacy?

  • Tech users who use Google to find information on medication abortions or seek an Uber ride to the clinic could be leaving a digital trail for investigators.
  • “I think it's good that we were called out,” Auren Hoffman, CEO of location data provider SafeGraph, told Protocol after the company was blasted for selling information that showed where groups of people visiting clinics providing family planning and abortion services had traveled from, how long they stayed and where they traveled afterward.
  • Privacy experts are concerned that period-tracking apps could be forced to hand over some of users’ most private information, which could then be used as evidence against people who choose to terminate their pregnancies.
  • The telehealth boom of the last two years and regulatory changes at the FDA have launched a batch of startups that provide safe, effective abortion pills by mail. But the people behind these companies are equally cautious about overselling their promise, as they grapple with what the court’s decision means for the industry.
  • A recent investigation revealed that Meta might be putting the data of users seeking abortions at risk. Facebook’s automated Meta Pixel tool has been collecting data on people who make appointments or visit the websites of crisis pregnancy centers, fake abortion centers run by anti-abortion organizations.

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