People

Tech is writing checks to anti-racism groups. Here's who's giving, and how much.

Financial contributions are one of the five actions that Black Tech for Black Lives has asked "allies" to take in order to help.

A sign that says "silence is complicity"

Some tech companies are promising money for groups fighting against racial injustice.

Photo: Ilyas Tayfun Salci/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Tech companies and the people who lead them have said many words about the killing of George Floyd and the protests that have followed. Some of them have backed that talk with the promise of money for groups fighting against racial injustice.

While the contributions don't solve tech's own diversity problems, they are one of the five actions that Black Tech for Black Lives — a coalition of Black founders, advocates and investors — has asked "allies" to take in order to help.

What follows is a list of companies and prominent individuals in the tech community who have pledged money and to whom. It is not a comprehensive list; if we've missed your company's pledge, please email us at hello@protocol.com to let us know, and we'll continue to add to this list.

23andme

Matching employee donations to Black Lives Matter, Equal Justice Initiative and Black Girls Code.

A16z

Set up a Talent x Opportunity Fund with an initial $2.2 million "for entrepreneurs who have the talent, drive and ideas to build great businesses but lack the typical background and resources to do so."

Airbnb

Pledged $500,000 and to match employee contributions to the NAACP and Black Lives Matter.

Amazon

Pledged $10 million to the ACLU Foundation, the Brennan Center for Justice, the Equal Justice Initiative, the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the NAACP, the National Bar Association, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the National Urban League, Thurgood Marshall College Fund, UNCF (United Negro College Fund), and Year Up, In addition, the company said its Black Employee Network "will receive a grant to fund local organizations that support education and racial equality initiatives in communities across the country where our employees live and work."

Apple

Launched $100 million Racial Equity and Justice Initiative with a focus on "education, economic equality and criminal justice reform." Pledged to donate to a number of groups including the Equal Justice Initiative — and to match 2:1 all employee contributions in the month of June.

Away

Pledged to donate to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, SPLC Action Fund and The Bail Project. Away CEO Jen Rubio is making additional contributions with her husband, Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield (see below).

Box

CEO Aaron Levie, together with his wife, Paradigm CEO Joelle Emerson, pledged $500,000 to "support organizations that are doing work in this space."

Bravado

Matching employee donations to NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Equal Justice Initiative, Black Girls Code, Black Lives Matter, Minnesota Freedom Fund, Survived and Punished, National Bail Fund Network and BYP100. CEO Sahil Mansuri also personally pledged to donate $10,000 to various groups and to match employee donations 3:1.

Cisco

Pledged $5 million to the Equal Justice Initiative, NAACP, Color of Change and Black Lives Matter. Cisco will also donate to its own fund for fighting racism.

DocuSign

Pledged $500,000 to support the NAACP and social justice causes, and to triple-match employee contributions to those causes.

DoorDash

Pledged $500,000 to Black Lives Matter and $500,000 for the creation of a fund to be directed by the Black@DoorDash ERG toward state and local organizations.

Drizly

Pledged to make a donation to Color of Change.

Dropbox

Co-founder and CEO Drew Houston pledged $500,000 to the Black Lives Matter Foundation, and to match employee donations to the Black Lives Matter Foundation, the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and the National Urban League throughout the month of June.

Duolingo

Matching employee donations to "organizations working to change the system."

Eaze

Pledged $25,000 to the California NAACP.

Etsy

Pledged $500,000 to the Equal Justice Initiative and $500,000 to Borealis Philanthropy's Black-Led Movement Fund. Also matching employee donations.

Facebook

Pledged $10 million to "organizations locally and nationally that could most effectively use this right now."

Flexport

Pledged up to $180,000 ($100 per employee) to match employee donations to social justice causes of each employee's choice in June.

Gatsby

Matching community and team members' donations up to $25,000 (total) to ACLU-MN, Black Visions Collective, Fair Fight Action, North Star Health Collective, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Google

Pledged to give $12 million in funding to organizations working to address racial inequities, starting with the Center for Policing Equity and the Equal Justice Initiative. Also pledging "Ad Grants to help organizations fighting racial injustice provide critical information."

GoFundMe

Pledged $500,000 to start its new Justice & Equality Fund, which will initially focus on bail, racial justice and law enforcement reform.

Greylock Partners

Sarah Guo pledged to match $20,000 in donations made to the NCAA Legal Defense Fund, the Equal Justice Initiative, the Minnesota Freedom Fund and The Center For Policing Equity.

Grove Collaborative

Pledged $10,000 to charities and organizations fighting racism. And pledged to increase purchases from minority‑owned businesses by at least $250,000 through 2021.

Grubhub

Pledged $1 million to the Equal Justice Initiative.

HashiCorp

Pledged a donation to Southern Poverty Law Center and Minnesota Freedom Fund. CEO Dave McJannet and co-founders Mitchell Hashimoto and Armon Dadgar also pledged $60,000 toward the same groups.

Help Scout

Matching employee donations up to $300,000 to various organizations.

Intel

Pledged $1 million "in support of efforts to address social injustice and anti-racism across various nonprofits and communities." Encouraged employees to donate to Black Lives Matter Foundation, the Center for Policing Equity and the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, all of which are eligible for Intel's donation-matching program.

Kleiner Perkins

Mamoon Hamid pledged $100,000 in donations and to match another $100,000 in contributions made by others.

Lyft

Pledged $500,000 in ride credit to National Urban League, NAACP, National Action Network, Black Women's Roundtable and National Bail Fund Network; and LyftUp ride credit to Lake Street Council.

Niantic

Pledged a minimum of $5 million to fund new projects from black gaming and AR creators that can live on the Niantic platform and to U.S. nonprofit organizations that are helping local communities rebuild, $100,000 to the Marsha P. Johnson Institute, and an employee match of up to $50,000.

PayPal

Pledged $530 million to support Black and minority-owned businesses and communities in the U.S.

Peloton

Pledged $500,000 to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Pinterest

Pledged 25,000 shares of stock, $250,000 in investments, and $750,000 in paid media to organizations that support racial justice.

The Pokémon Company International

Pledged to donate $100,000 to NAACP and $100,000 to Black Lives Matter.

Reddit

Co-founder and former board member Alexis Ohanian pledged $1 million to Colin Kaepernick's organization, Know Your Rights Camp.

Riot Games

Through its Social Impact Fund, pledged $1 million in the areas of "justice reform, investing in minority owned businesses, creating opportunities for minorities in our industry, continued education, and addressing bias and discrimination in the workforce," starting with an initial contribution to The Innocence Project and the ACLU.

RobinHood

Pledged $500,000 to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Salesforce

Pledged $1 million to the NAACP. In April, partnered with BET and United Way on their relief fund, donating $500,000 to help Black American families most affected by the crisis.

Sequoia Capital

Pledged to contribute $2 for every dollar donated by employees.

Shopify

Pledged $1 million to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund ($500,000), Black Health Alliance ($250,000) and Campaign Zero ($250,000).

Slack

CEO Stewart Butterfield and his partner, Away CEO Jen Rubio, pledged to make a $700,000 donation plus match $300,000 to Black Lives Matter, the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Bail Project, the Equal Justice Initiative, the Center for Policing Equity, Campaign Zero, Project Nia, Color of Change, Until Freedom and The Loveland Foundation.

Snap

In a staff memo, CEO Evan Spiegel wrote: "Some of you have asked about whether Snap will contribute to organizations that support equality and justice. The answer is yes. But in my experience, philanthropy is simply unable to make more than a dent in the grave injustices we face."

SoFi

Pledged $1 million to organizations "chosen by the SoFi employee resource group So(ul)Fi, which empowers black employees, members and allies."

SoftBank

Set up a $100 million investment fund, called the Opportunity Growth Fund, for minority-owned businesses.

Stitch Fix

Pledged $100,000 to Black Lives Matter, and will match an additional $100,000 of employee donations to the organization. Founder and CEO Katrina Lake will commit $100,000 to "organizations promoting justice and equality for the black community." And Stitchfix will donate at least $500,000 per year over the next five years "to provide sustained financial support to organizations advancing social justice."

Str​ipe

Pledged $100,000 each to "five organizations working on reforming U.S. policing practices or the criminal justice system."

The Wing

Pledged $200,000 to Color of Change, the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the Brooklyn Community Bail Fund.

TikTok

Pledged $3 million to nonprofits that help the black community and $1 million to fight racial injustice and inequality in the U.S.

Tinder

Pledged a donation to Black Lives Matter.

Twitter

As part of the Start Small Grants he created in response to the pandemic, CEO Jack Dorsey is pledging $3 million to Colin Kaepernick's organization, Know Your Rights Camp.

Uber

Pledged $1 million to the Equal Justice Initiative and the Center for Policing Equity.

Ubisoft

Pledged $100,000 to the NAACP and Black Lives Matter.

Verizon

Pledged $10 million to aid organizations dedicated to equality and social justice.

Warby Parker

Pledged $1 million to organizations and initiatives focused on combating systemic racism.

WeWork

Pledged $2 million in grants to "Black-owned WeWork member businesses."

YouTube

Pledged $1 million to the Center for Policing Equity. Announced a $100 million fund dedicated to "amplifying and developing the voices of Black creators and artists and their stories."

Updated June 12, 2020.

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