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Ping-Pong and catered lunches are back — for the few SF tech startups willing to reopen

Remote is trendy, but some San Francisco tech workers are choosing to go back to work.

Woman working with mask on

Tech offices are starting to reopen in San Francisco, but few companies are actually going back.

Photo: Engin Akyurt/Unsplash

For the last few days, Fast CEO Domm Holland has been able to look out from his standing desk and see his co-workers working alongside him. They shared a catered lunch inside their lofty SOMA-based office, and Holland raided the snack kitchen.

These would have all been normal scenes at a tech company in 2019, but for Holland, it's the first time since March that he's been able to return to a bit of "normal" after San Francisco finally began reopening offices this week.

He even managed to squeeze in a game of Ping-Pong, a startup classic, with a co-worker at his online checkout system startup. "It's a great activity because it's a socially distanced game," he told Protocol, even with masks required and having to wipe down the equipment after.

Fast's return to the office is still a rarity in Silicon Valley. While other cities and states have allowed office reopenings for a while, San Francisco only announced last week that it would begin to allow nonessential office workers back beginning Oct. 27 and capped office attendance at 25%.

And that's if they choose to reopen at all. Many tech companies, including several Bay Area giants, have decided to go entirely remote or postpone reopening until next summer.

"All my NYC companies are back in the office at this point, although with limited capacity and lots of ventilation," wrote Founders Fund investor Delian Asparouhov in an email to Protocol. He pointed out that some Bay Area labs have been back for a while, especially those working on hard tech, but many startups have held off so far.

"A lot of the companies in my portfolio in SF are being slower to the draw than I'd have guessed in terms of their time frames for returning to office. I'd still say most of them aren't even really thinking about doing it until end of Q1 at the earliest," he added.

Data from BART ridership shows there wasn't a major rush back once San Francisco gave the green light to reopen. Ridership is only up a few hundred people systemwide in the days since offices reopened, and it's still down 87% from previous ridership levels.

"The reopening is not a moment in time," said Envoy's CEO Larry Gadea. "The reopening is something that happens over the next one to two years, and it's going to be gradual."

His company, once synonymous with those tablets visitors use to sign in at tech companies, has been on the frontlines of trying to help offices get back to work. It's rolled out products like Envoy Protect, which helps manage desk reservations, health questionnaires and touchless sign-ins at the office, to help make it easier for companies to know who and how many employees are at work at any given time.

Still, the CEOs Gadea talks to remain cautious about bringing their employees to work, afraid to be the epicenter of an outbreak or to be seen as forcing employees back before they are ready. In a recent national survey run by Envoy and Wakefield, 73% of the 1,000 people surveyed said they were worried about going to the physical office. The study also found that about a fifth of employees have returned to their offices already, and 39% of employees never stopped going.

Tech workers in the study were the most worried about returning to the office, and San Francisco tech companies in particular have been more conservative than most, Gadea said. Of the most ambitious companies going back, Gadea says he's seeing around 10% to 15% of employees returning to the office. At Envoy, only a handful of its 120 employees have been back to the office, and while Gadea has been in a few times for things like 2021 planning meetings, even he hasn't made a full-fledged return.

"I get that we can all be robots at home and write code and get evaluated only for the output that we do, but it's very hard to be creative, to brainstorm and collaborate very specifically on things," he said. "I think people are getting there's a difference between being able to get your work done and being able to get your work done really well in a way that you're really excited and bought in."

It's the potential boost in productivity and engagement with work and coworkers that has some employees excited to go back. Despite only being back a few days, Founders Fund's Asparouhov already likes the normalcy of commuting and being back at the office. The group team lunches may be gone and replaced with individual boxed lunches, but there's still the option of seeing a colleague through a glass wall and asking to go on a walk for just a small bit of watercooler talk. He'd already been going for socially distanced walks with founders to be able to meet them "mask to mask," but going back to work in an office has already helped life feel closer to ordinary.

"Despite having a very sparse office, and having to meet with founders wearing a mask, my current workflow actually feels pretty 'normal' despite being quite different from my 2019 workflow," he said.

Fast's Holland had been laying the groundwork for six months to make sure his company would be able to return when San Francisco finally decided to reopen. The office used to fit 120 desks comfortably, and it's been reduced to 25 socially distanced workspaces. The company set up a ticketing system so people can sign up for the nine available slots a day. The catered lunches aren't buffet trays, but individual orders from Uber Eats and DoorDash. Even with the changes, Holland is still feeling the rush from just being able to bring a small bit of community back into his work life, and so far, the maxed-out attendance in the office has shown that other employees have craved it, too.

"Most of the people I know today and am friends with I met through work," Holland said. "So I am bullish on keeping the community alive. They don't necessarily need to be on your team, but we can still provide a place and a community for people."

The biggest change, though, has just been rethinking what the office actually means to Fast. The startup instituted early in the pandemic a Fast Flex policy, which allows people to work from anywhere, whether it's in a foreign country or while on a road trip or just from their couch. It also started hiring more people from outside the Bay Area, so now around 30 of Fast's 70 employees live outside of Silicon Valley. "We're in a position where nobody has to come in ever again if they don't want to — and that's fine," he said.

Because it will always be a distributed company now, Holland thinks the office will serve more as a co-working space that's exclusively for Fast employees rather than a place for entire teams to report to work. Dropbox is taking a similar tack by launching "studios" instead of offices. For Dropbox employees, their daily work will be expected to be done in co-working spaces or from their couch, but the company will have more communal studios for team building, training and events.

While many companies are giving up their office spaces, Holland isn't backing away from them. Instead, he expects to see Fast open more in the future.

"I am bullish on the future of offices, but the way that I think of them is different from before COVID," he said. "We'll open up offices in other parts of the world, but I think of our offices as co-working offices for employees. They're not designed to be the office that you and your team and your boss all work from."

App store laws, Microsoft AR and Square buys Tidal

Welcome to this weekend's Source Code podcast.

Cole Burston/Bloomberg

This week on the Source Code podcast: First, an update on Google's user-tracking change. Then, Ben Pimentel joins the show to discuss Square buying Tidal, and what it means for the fintech and music worlds. Later, Emily Birnbaum explains the bill moving through the Arizona legislature that has Google and Apple worried about the future of app stores. And finally, Janko Roettgers discusses Microsoft Mesh, the state of AR and VR headsets, and when we're all going to be doing meetings as holograms.

For more on the topics in this episode:

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David Pierce

David Pierce ( @pierce) is Protocol's editor at large. Prior to joining Protocol, he was a columnist at The Wall Street Journal, a senior writer with Wired, and deputy editor at The Verge. He owns all the phones.

Sponsored Content

The future of computing at the edge: an interview with Intel’s Tom Lantzsch

An interview with Tom Lantzsch, SVP and GM, Internet of Things Group at Intel

An interview with Tom Lantzsch

Senior Vice President and General Manager of the Internet of Things Group (IoT) at Intel Corporation

Edge computing had been on the rise in the last 18 months – and accelerated amid the need for new applications to solve challenges created by the Covid-19 pandemic. Tom Lantzsch, Senior Vice President and General Manager of the Internet of Things Group (IoT) at Intel Corp., thinks there are more innovations to come – and wants technology leaders to think equally about data and the algorithms as critical differentiators.

In his role at Intel, Lantzsch leads the worldwide group of solutions architects across IoT market segments, including retail, banking, hospitality, education, industrial, transportation, smart cities and healthcare. And he's seen first-hand how artificial intelligence run at the edge can have a big impact on customers' success.

Protocol sat down with Lantzsch to talk about the challenges faced by companies seeking to move from the cloud to the edge; some of the surprising ways that Intel has found to help customers and the next big breakthrough in this space.

What are the biggest trends you are seeing with edge computing and IoT?

A few years ago, there was a notion that the edge was going to be a simplistic model, where we were going to have everything connected up into the cloud and all the compute was going to happen in the cloud. At Intel, we had a bit of a contrarian view. We thought much of the interesting compute was going to happen closer to where data was created. And we believed, at that time, that camera technology was going to be the driving force – that just the sheer amount of content that was created would be overwhelming to ship to the cloud – so we'd have to do compute at the edge. A few years later – that hypothesis is in action and we're seeing edge compute happen in a big way.

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Saul Hudson
Saul Hudson has a deep knowledge of creating brand voice identity, especially in understanding and targeting messages in cutting-edge technologies. He enjoys commissioning, editing, writing, and business development, in helping companies to build passionate audiences and accelerate their growth. Hudson has reported from more than 30 countries, from war zones to boardrooms to presidential palaces. He has led multinational, multi-lingual teams and managed operations for hundreds of journalists. Hudson is a Managing Partner at Angle42, a strategic communications consultancy.
People

Google’s trying to build a more inclusive, less chaotic future of work

Javier Soltero, the VP of Workspace at Google, said time management is everything.

With everyone working in new places, Google believes time management is everything.

Image: Google

Javier Soltero was still pretty new to the G Suite team when the pandemic hit. Pretty quickly, everything about Google's hugely popular suite of work tools seemed to change. (It's not even called G Suite anymore, but rather Workspace.) And Soltero had to both guide his team through a new way of working and help them build the tools to guide billions of Workspace users.

This week, Soltero and his team announced a number of new Workspace features designed to help people manage their time, collaborate and get stuff done more effectively. It offered new tools for frontline workers to communicate better, more hardware for hybrid meetings, lots of Assistant and Calendar features to make planning easier and a picture-in-picture mode so people could be on Meet calls without really having to pay attention.

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David Pierce

David Pierce ( @pierce) is Protocol's editor at large. Prior to joining Protocol, he was a columnist at The Wall Street Journal, a senior writer with Wired, and deputy editor at The Verge. He owns all the phones.

Transforming 2021

Blockchain, QR codes and your phone: the race to build vaccine passports

Digital verification systems could give people the freedom to work and travel. Here's how they could actually happen.

One day, you might not need to carry that physical passport around, either.

Photo: CommonPass

There will come a time, hopefully in the near future, when you'll feel comfortable getting on a plane again. You might even stop at the lounge at the airport, head to the regional office when you land and maybe even see a concert that evening. This seemingly distant reality will depend upon vaccine rollouts continuing on schedule, an open-sourced digital verification system and, amazingly, the blockchain.

Several countries around the world have begun to prepare for what comes after vaccinations. Swaths of the population will be vaccinated before others, but that hasn't stopped industries decimated by the pandemic from pioneering ways to get some people back to work and play. One of the most promising efforts is the idea of a "vaccine passport," which would allow individuals to show proof that they've been vaccinated against COVID-19 in a way that could be verified by businesses to allow them to travel, work or relax in public without a great fear of spreading the virus.

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Mike Murphy

Mike Murphy ( @mcwm) is the director of special projects at Protocol, focusing on the industries being rapidly upended by technology and the companies disrupting incumbents. Previously, Mike was the technology editor at Quartz, where he frequently wrote on robotics, artificial intelligence, and consumer electronics.

People

Citizen’s plan to keep people safe (and beat COVID-19) with an app

Citizen CEO Andrew Frame talks privacy, safety, coronavirus and the future of the neighborhood watch.

Citizen added COVID-19 tracking to its app over the summer — but its bigger plans got derailed.

Photo: Citizen

Citizen is an app built on the idea that transparency is a good thing. It's the place users — more than 7 million of them, in 28 cities with many more to come soon — can find out when there's a crime, a protest or an incident of any kind nearby. (Just yesterday, it alerted me, along with 17,900 residents of Washington, D.C., that it was about to get very windy. It did indeed get windy.) Users can stream or upload video of what's going on, locals can chat about the latest incidents and everyone's a little safer at the end of the day knowing what's happening in their city.

At least, that's how CEO Andrew Frame sees it. Critics of Citizen say the app is creating hordes of voyeurs, incentivizing people to run into dangerous situations just to grab a video, and encouraging racial profiling and other problematic behaviors all under the guise of whatever "safety" means. They say the app promotes paranoia, alerting users to things that they don't actually need to know about. (That the app was originally called "Vigilante" doesn't help its case.)

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David Pierce

David Pierce ( @pierce) is Protocol's editor at large. Prior to joining Protocol, he was a columnist at The Wall Street Journal, a senior writer with Wired, and deputy editor at The Verge. He owns all the phones.

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